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RFID INFOSEC

Radio frequency identification (RFID) information systems provide information to users about objects with RFID tags. RFID systems require the application of information systems security (INFOSEC) to protect the information from tampering, unauthorized information disclosure, and denial of service to authorized users.

Fingerprinting RFID Tags with Transfer-of-Ownership Capabilities

Dale R. Thompson and Jia Di, associate professors of computer science and computer engineering at the University of Arkansas, have received a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a technology that will re-define the authentication of a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tag from being something the tag "knows" to being something the tag "is," like a fingerprint, and to develop new hardware primitives for transferring ownership of the tag by manipulating the fingerprint in a controlled way.  The research will lead to secure and private contactless identification and transfer of ownership of objects.  This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation, CISE/CNS Trustworthy Computing area, under Grant No. CNS-1053286.

Anti-Counterfeiting RFID Tags

Dale R. Thompson and Jia Di, associate professors of computer science and computer engineering at the University of Arkansas, have been named as principal investigators for an anti-counterfeiting RFID tag project. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation CISE/CNS and the Cyber Trust area. The objective of the anti-counterfeiting RFID tag research is to prevent counterfeiting of RFID tags by offering mitigating techniques that provide different levels of protection and have different requirements in cost and implementation complexity in order to provide appropriately secure and flexible solutions for different applications. The anticipated results of this high-risk and high-payoff area of research are cost-effective and reliable anti-counterfeiting techniques to prevent cloning of RFID tags.  This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation, Cyber Trust area, under Grant No. CNS-0716578.

RFID INFOSEC for Nation-wide Engineering Education

Typically, students experience only narrowly focused layers of a RFID system such as the tag, air interface, reader, network, middleware, or applications in separate courses instead of a system-wide approach. The goal of this project is to improve the quality of education nation-wide in RFID INFOSEC by creating new learning materials and teaching strategies that address security at the tag, air interface, reader, network, middleware, and application layers. The principal investigators are Drs. Dale R. Thompson and Jia Di. Senior investigators are Drs. Michael K. Daugherty and Craig W. Thompson. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation DUE/CCLI program under Grant No. DUE-0736741.